Panels and Speaker Bios

Welcome Remarks

G.P. “Bud” Peterson

President, Georgia Institute of Technology

 

G. P. “Bud” Peterson was appointed as the 11th president of Georgia Tech on April 1, 2009. Peterson came to Georgia Tech from the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he served as chancellor. Prior to that, he served as provost at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in New York, and on the faculty and in leadership positions at Texas A&M University for 19 years. He has worked for NASA and the National Science Foundation (NSF). Throughout his career, Peterson has played an active role in helping to establish the national education and research agendas, serving on many industry, government, and academic task forces and committees. A distinguished scientist, he was appointed in 2008 by President George W. Bush, and again in 2014 by President Barack Obama, to serve as a member of the National Science Board. Peterson earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering, a second bachelor’s degree in mathematics, and a master’s degree in engineering, all from Kansas State University. He earned a PhD in mechanical engineering from Texas A&M University. He and his wife, Val, have four adult children, two of whom are Georgia Tech alumni.

Keynote Speaker

Mayor Pete Buttigieg

South Bend, Indiana

 

Pete Buttigieg (boot-edge- edge) is the Mayor of South Bend, Indiana’s fourth-largest city. A Rhodes Scholar, he holds degrees from Oxford and Harvard Universities. He was the Democratic nominee for Indiana State Treasurer in 2010 against incumbent Richard Mourdock. Previously he was a management consultant at McKinsey, where he worked in energy, retail, economic development, and logistics. Elected in 2011 at the age of 29, he is one of America’s youngest mayors of a city with over 100,000 residents. A lieutenant in the U.S. Navy Reserve, he spent most of 2014 on leave from the office while deployed to Afghanistan.

Creating a Culture of Innovation (Wednesday, December 13th at 9:30AM)

Join Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Former Mayor Steve Goldsmith, and Former Mayor Martin O’Malley as they discuss the role of mayors and mayors offices in ushering in a new wave of innovative policies and technologies into city governments.

Debra Lam- Moderator

Managing Director for Smart Cities and Inclusive Innovation

 

Debra Lam is managing director for Smart Cities and Inclusive Innovation at Georgia Tech’s Institute for People and Technology. She has over a decade of experience in urban innovation and resilience, strategy and management, and previously served as Chief Innovation and Performance Officer for the City of Pittsburgh. Lam is a founding leader of the MetroLab Network and serves on their executive steering committee. She’s also a World Cities Summit Young Leader, a Leadership Pittsburgh alumni, and has spoken nationally and internationally on inclusive innovation, performance management, data-driven decision-making, and cultural change. Management Today named Lam to its “35 Women Under 35” list, and she was also a finalist for Women of the Future, Science and Technology.

Mayor Pete Buttigieg

South Bend, Indiana

 

Pete Buttigieg (boot-edge- edge) is the Mayor of South Bend, Indiana’s fourth-largest city. A Rhodes Scholar, he holds degrees from Oxford and Harvard Universities. He was the Democratic nominee for Indiana State Treasurer in 2010 against incumbent Richard Mourdock. Previously he was a management consultant at McKinsey, where he worked in energy, retail, economic development, and logistics. Elected in 2011 at the age of 29, he is one of America’s youngest mayors of a city with over 100,000 residents. A lieutenant in the U.S. Navy Reserve, he spent most of 2014 on leave from the office while deployed to Afghanistan.

Stephen Goldsmith

Former Mayor of Indianapolis

 

Stephen Goldsmith is the Daniel Paul Professor of the Practice of Government and the Director of the Innovations in American Government Program at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He currently directs Data-Smart City Solutions, a project to highlight local government efforts to use new technologies that connect breakthroughs in the use of big data analytics with community input to reshape the relationship between government and citizen. He previously served as Deputy Mayor of New York and Mayor of Indianapolis, where he earned a reputation as one of the country’s leaders in public-private partnerships, competition, and privatization. Stephen was also the chief domestic policy advisor to the George W. Bush campaign in 2000, the Chair of the Corporation for National and Community Service, and the district attorney for Marion County, Indiana from 1979 to 1990. He has written The Power of Social Innovation; Governing by Network: the New Shape of the Public Sector; Putting Faith in Neighborhoods: Making Cities Work through Grassroots Citizenship and The Twenty-First Century City: Resurrecting Urban America; and The Responsive City: Engaging Communities Through Data-Smart Governance.

Martin O’Malley

Former Governor of Maryland and Former Mayor of Baltimore

 

Martin O’Malley served as the 61st Governor of Maryland from 2007 to 2015 and the 47th Mayor of the City of Baltimore from 1999 until 2007.  His time as governor and mayor was marked by a steadfast commitment to data-driven decision-making.  As mayor, he introduced CitiStat, a performance-based management system that produced dramatic improvements in city services and efficiency and led to Baltimore being awarded the Innovations in Government Award from the Kennedy School at Harvard in 2001.  CitiStat has served as a model for cities across the world.  As governor, he continued to demonstrate results-driven leadership with the introduction of StateStat and BayStat, a system which has since inspired other systems including EPA’s ChesapeakeStat program.  In 2009, Governing Magazine named O’Malley Public Official of the Year for his ability to “improve performance by measuring what [states] do and relentlessly monitoring their progress”.  Governor O’Malley received his bachelor’s degree from Catholic University and his law degree from the University of Maryland.  He and his wife, Katie, a District Court judge, have two daughters, Grace and Tara, and two sons, William and Jack.

The Human Services 360 Project: Supporting Next Generation Human Service Infrastructure to Address Big Picture Questions (Wednesday, December 13th at 11:40AM)

Human Services 360 is an array of tools and support designed to give policy makers and contract administrators the insights they need not only to see the full landscape of services available to their clients, but also to make targeted, strategic decisions that will improve the outcomes these systems deliver. With implementation support to integrate these new tools into city officials’ existing decision systems, Human Services 360 aims to do more than move data to knowledge: it aims to move data to action and action to outcomes. Learn more about this project here.

Julia Koschinsky

Research Director, Center for Spatial Data Science, University of Chicago

 

Julia Koschinsky is the Research Director of the Center for Spatial Data Science at the University of Chicago and has been part of Professor Luc Anselin’s team for over ten years. She has been conducting and managing research funded through federal awards of over $8 million to gain insights from the spatial dimensions of urban challenges in housing, health, and the built environment. She received her PhD in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Nicole Marwell

Associate Professor, University of Chicago, School of Social Service Administration

 

Nicole Marwell is an Associate Professor in the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration. Her research examines urban governance, with a focus on the diverse intersections between nonprofit organizations, government bureaucracies, and politics.  Her current research projects include: (1) the causes and consequences of spatial inequality in government contracting to nonprofit organizations in New York City; (2) direct dynamics of political patronage and political exchange in a municipal legislature; and (3) the citizenship and financial implications of collaborative governance in child welfare. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation and other funders. Professor Marwell received her PhD in sociology from the University of Chicago.

Nick Mader

Senior Researcher, Chapin Hall, University of Chicago

 

Nicholas Mader is a Senior Researcher at Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago. His work focuses on improving outcomes for at-risk youth by guiding policy development and evaluating youth service programs in partnership with city agencies and non-profit providers. His methodological interests are in using rigorous quantitative methods applied to administrative data sets—the same data used by policy makers—that are augmented with data from other agencies, and data actively collected for applied questions. At Chapin Hall, this work focuses on merging student educational performance with out-of-school factors such as family instability, family poverty, criminal activity of friends or family, and exposure to violence, child abuse or neglect. Dr. Mader earned a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin.

Michael Stiehl

Senior Policy Analyst, Chapin Hall

 

Mike Stiehl is a Senior Policy Analyst at Chapin Hall, where he works alongside Chapin Hall’s partners, including government agencies and non-profit organizations, to successfully use and translate data to guide the implementation and evaluation of policies and services for vulnerable children. Mr. Stiehl also leverages his extensive expertise in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial analysis and works with Chapin Hall’s research, research technology and policy staff on continuous quality improvement and scaling evidence-based practices in public systems. Mr. Stiehl holds a master’s degree in urban and regional planning and economic development from the University of Wisconsin.

Breakout Discussion: Engaging Students and Research Fellows (Wednesday, December 13th at 1:00PM)

Andrew Means – Moderator

Director, beyond.uptake
Co-Founder, The Impact Lab

 

Andrew Means is the Director of beyond.uptake the philanthropic and civic innovation arm of Uptake and Co-Founder at The Impact Lab. He has dedicated his career to creating a more effective and efficient social sector by developing data tools that help organizations improve their impact. Additionally, Andrew is founder of Data Analysts for Social Good, a professional organization for individuals interested in how data, research, and analytics are changing the social sector. Through this work Andrew hosts webinars, classes, and an annual conference attracting hundreds of leaders from around the world. Prior to founding The Impact Lab, Andrew worked as Associate Director at the Center for Data Science & Public Policy at The University of Chicago; Manager, Director of Impact Measurement & Data Storytelling at Groupon; and Director of Research & Analytics at the YMCA of Metropolitan Chicago. In all these roles Andrew has helped develop teams dedicated to using data to further the impact of the social sector.

Constantine Kontokosta

Deputy Director for Academics, NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress

 

Assistant Professor Constantine Kontokosta, who also serves as the Deputy Director for Academics at the NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress (CUSP), is an expert in the field of Urban Informatics—which focuses on gathering, visualizing, and analyzing data on factors such as traffic volume, noise levels, energy use, and mobility in order to help make cities more efficient, livable, and sustainable. At CUSP and Tandon, he heads the Quantified Community Research Lab—a groundbreaking project that is making Hudson Yards, the 28-acre, 20-million square foot “city-within-a-city” on the west side of Manhattan, the nation’s first fully instrumented and quantified neighborhood lab; he’s since expanded the Quantified Community initiative with projects in Lower Manhattan and the Red Hook section of Brooklyn.

Dan O’Brien

Assistant Professor, Northeastern University
Co-Director, Boston Area Research Initiative

 

Dan O’Brien joined the Northeastern faculty in 2014 from Harvard University where he was the research director for the Boston Area Research Initiative. In this role he led and coordinated a range of interdisciplinary projects that bring together local researchers, policymakers, and practitioners in the study of Boston. His research uses large, administrative data sets (i.e., “Big Data”) in conjunction with traditional methodologies to explore the behavioral and social dynamics of urban neighborhoods, particularly surrounding “broken windows theory.” Much of his current work builds on a recent paper, “Ecometrics in the Age of Big Data,” (co-authored with Robert J. Sampson and Christopher Winship) that presents a methodology for measuring neighborhood characteristics in the digital age.

Sarah Stone

Executive Director, eScience Institute

 

Sarah Stone became the Executive Director of the eScience Institute in September 2016, a position she job shares with Micaela Parker. Together with Dr. Parker, Stone handles eScience operations and planning, serving as the primary administrative contact for university and industry partners, funding agencies and the public. She helps to manage joint activities with partner institutions, including UC Berkeley and NYU, coordinates eScience outreach activities, and jointly runs the Data Science for Social Good (DSSG) program. Dr. Stone has a passion for fostering education and research collaborations across disciplines. As Deputy Director of the West Big Data Innovation Hub (WBDIH), she is involved in the thematic development of the WBDIH Urban Science working group.

Ellen Zegura

Professor and Chair, School of Computer Science, Georgia Tech

 

Dr. Ellen Zegura received the B.S. degree in Computer Science (1987), the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering (1987), the M.S. degree in Computer Science (1990) and the D.Sc. in Computer Science (1993) all from Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri. Since 1993, she has been on the faculty in the College of Computing at Georgia Tech. She was an Assistant Dean in charge of Space and Facilities Planning from Fall 2000 to January 2003. She served as Interim Dean of the College for six months in 2002. She was Associate Dean responsible for Research and Graduate Programs from 2003-2005. She served as the first Chair of the School of Computer Science from 2005-2012. She is a Fellow of the IEE and the ACM. She is the proud mom of two girls, Carmen (born in August of 1998) and Bethany (born in May of 2001), whose pictures never made it onto the web until Facebook.

Breakout Discussion: Citizen Engagement with Data and R&D Projects (Wednesday, December 13th at 1:00PM)

Christopher Le Dantec – Moderator

Associate Professor of Digital Media in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication at Georgia Tech

 

Christopher Le Dantec is an Assistant Professor in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication. His research is focused on integrating theoretical, empirical, and design-based investigations of mobile and social technologies in support of community and civic engagement. With an interest in digital disparities, Dr. Le Dantec examines alternate constraints on mobile computing in urban life, information technology and social institutions, and the use of participatory design for articulating social issues and constructing publics.

Meghan Cook

Program Director, Center for Technology in Government, University at Albany, SUNY

 

As Program Director of the Center for Technology in Government, University at Albany, State University of New York, Meghan leads multi sector and interdisciplinary innovation initiatives that build capability in public sector organizations and agencies throughout the world. Through a unique and collaborative process, Meghan works side by side with international, federal, state and local government leaders to produce new knowledge and actionable results. With over 18 years of experience working on public sector innovation efforts, Meghan is considered an expert in digital government transformation.

Jen Duthie

Intelligent Transportation Systems Engineer, City of Austin

 

Jen Duthie is the Intelligent Transportation Systems Engineer with the City of Austin. Her job duties include overseeing the City’s traffic management center, and assisting with the City’s smart city initiatives. Prior to joining the City of Austin earlier this year, Dr. Duthie directed a transportation research group at The University of Texas at Austin.

Dan Gilman

Councilman, City of Pittsburgh

 

Dan Gilman currently serves on the Pittsburgh City Council representing the 8th District, including the neighborhoods of Oakland, Point Breeze, Shadyside and Squirrel Hill. During his first term, Councilman Gilman has focused on creating a more accountable city government, embracing Pittsburgh’s technological renaissance in order to improve City services, and making Pittsburgh a more family-friendly and progressive city. Councilman Gilman has championed Pittsburgh’s rebirth as a nationwide leader in technology and innovation and led efforts to bring government into the 21st century. He played an integral role in launching Building Eye, an interactive software platform with zoning and permitting information available to the public. He called on PWSA to create an early detection system to alert residents when consumption begins to exceed previous months. He pushed the Parking Authority to modernize their technology by eliminating paper permit stickers and replacing them with license plate reading technology.

Ryan Locicero

American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science & Technology Policy Fellow, NSF

 

Ryan Locicero is an AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow at NSF in the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering’s (CISE) Office of the Assistant Director.  He contributes to CISE research and education activities, including Foundation-wide initiatives such as Smart & Connected Communities (NSF 16-610) and Innovations at the Nexus of Food, Energy and Water Systems (NSF-16-524).

 

Ryan Locicero holds a Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering, M.E. in Environmental Engineering Sciences, and B.S. in Civil Engineering.  His doctoral research aimed to mainstream green infrastructure and stormwater management by focusing on education and outreach as a driving force for change in public and professional perception. Prior to serving at NSF, Ryan lived in the Pacific Northwest where he conducted innovative watershed-scale research on optimal sub-basin planning, aimed at developing a diverse and data rich decision support platform for the public utility sector.  Ryan is also a registered Professional Engineer in the State of Florida and worked for several years as a private consultant on public infrastructure projects.

Procuring Tech and Innovation (Wednesday, December 13th at 2:30 PM)

Ben Levine – Moderator

Executive Director, MetroLab Network

 

Ben serves as Executive Director of MetroLab Network, having initially served as Interim Director of the organization following its launch. Prior to that role, Ben served as a Policy Advisor at the U.S. Department of the Treasury, where he was responsible for policy development pertaining to state and local government finance, with a particular focus on infrastructure policy. He worked closely with the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy on the organization and launch of MetroLab Network. Prior to his role at Treasury, Ben worked at Morgan Stanley, where he provided investment banking services to state and local government clients. He is a graduate of the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.

Sandra Baer

Chief Marketing Officer, CIVIQ

 

Throughout her career, Ms. Baer has been a champion of creative collaboration between the public and private sector. She has worked with city leaders and smart city companies, worldwide, for over 20 years, helping them discover the power of partnerships to build trust and create prosperous communities. Prior to CIVIQ, Sandra was the president of Personal Cities, a smart city company focused on stakeholder engagement and the acceleration of digital technology investments. She is the former Senior Director for Alliances at the Smart Cities Council, and has led business development efforts at the Discovery Channel, Nextel/Sprint, Ridge Global and Bloomberg Government. She serves as a board member and advisor on several professional and civic organizations, including Cityzenith, Nektria, The GreenBiz Group, the UN Foundation and the Washington Bach Consort. As a professional speaker and moderator, Ms. Baer has spoken at Smart City/Digital Out of Home conferences in the US, Europe, Latin America and the Middle East.

Jeff Hunter

Partner, Advanced Risk and Compliance Analytics Solutions, PwC

 

Jeff has 20+ years of professional experience in strategy & business development, data science, analytics, technology strategy, organizational & operational strategy / design /management, and corporate development within the High Tech & Financial Services sectors. He has conceptualized and built multi-million dollar Technology-Driven services businesses through the launch of new platforms that bridge technology, data and business models. He has used his business acumen and knowledge of IT on successful transformational efforts that have resulted in $100M+ revenue creation and millions of dollars in savings and improved management of large-scale business practices and global workforces.

Archana Vemulapalli

Chief Technology Officer, District of Columbia

 

Ms. Archana Vemulapalli was nominated to serve as the District’s Chief Technology Officer (CTO) by Mayor Muriel Bowser on January 12, 2016. She was confirmed by the DC Council on April 5, 2016. Prior to joining OCTO, Ms. Vemulapalli was Chief Technology Officer for Pristine Environments where she helped business leaders use technology as an enabler. In this position, she demonstrated technology leadership by developing and executing IT strategies to promote organizational growth and ensuring optimal utilization of emerging technologies. Ms. Vemulapalli also operated a successful technology and strategy consulting practice in Washington DC. Previously, she spent years as a technology strategy consultant at global consulting firms such as Booz Allen Hamilton, Deloitte Consulting and Lucent Technologies etc.

CIOs, CTOs, and CDOs, O my (Wednesday, December 13th at 4:15PM)

Samir Saini – Moderator

Chief Information Officer, City of Atlanta

 

Samir Saini is a business-centric CIO. He has 20 years of IT leadership experience, and has managed budgets upwards of $50M and a staff of 250. Throughout his daily operations, he continues to focus on his commitment to service the public at a local level as CIO for the City of Atlanta. In this position, Samir is responsible for information technology services for all 25 city departments, including Public Safety, Justice, Operations, Administration and Hartsfield-Jackson Int’l Airport. Samir’s experience expands across a variety of industries. He has had the pleasure of working for The General Electric Company, MGM Resorts Int’l, the Atlanta Housing Authority and now the City of Atlanta. Through the years, Samir has established a proven track record in partnering with various business leaders to adopt technology innovations that improve service delivery, grow revenue, improve productivity and mitigate cyber security risks.

Santiago Garces

City of South Bend, Chief Innovation Officer 

 

Santiago Garces started the Office of Innovation in January of 2015. The Office of Innovation improves the efficiency and effectiveness of municipal services by developing talent, optimizing processes, and designing technology solutions.  Some of the projects that the Office has implemented include a data framework to evaluate policies like the city’s Vacant and Abandoned Properties initiative; an actionable report that engages residents using municipal route, fleet, and dispatch optimization for public safety and municipal services. Overall the Office has identified and commenced implementations of projects that should save taxpayers over $11 million dollars. South Bend and the University of Notre Dame entered an agreement that identifies Mr. Garces as the point of contact for the city in its collaborations for smart city research. In September of 2015 South Bend and Notre Dame became founding members of the Metro Lab Network. Originally from Bogotá, Colombia, Mr. Garces holds degrees in Electrical Engineering, Political Science, and Technology Entrepreneurship from the University of Notre Dame.

Michael Mattmiller

City of Seattle, Chief Technology Officer

 

Michael Mattmiller is responsible for connecting the City to the public, providing the City’s workforce with productivity enhancing technology solutions, and ensuring the public can equitably participate in the City’s high-tech economy. Since joining the City in 2014, Michael has focused on delivering solutions that optimize the City’s use of technology resources, build trust in how the City uses the public’s information, and increased the availability of gigabit broadband service to homes and businesses across Seattle. Prior to his work at the City, Michael was a senior strategist at Microsoft focused on data privacy and protection practices across the company’s enterprise cloud solutions and a consultant with Pricewaterhouse Coopers.

Tom Schenk

Chief Data Officer, City of Chicago

 

Tom Schenk is a researcher and author in a number of fields, including data science, open data, data visualization, and education research and policy. He is currently the Chief Data Officer at the City of Chicago, which includes leadership of the strategic use of data to improve the efficiency of city operations and improve the quality of life for residents. Tom has led the expansion of Chicago’s open data portal, implementation of predictive analytics to optimize city services, and leading the City’s database and business intelligence teams. He leads  Tom has also co-founded and is currently the Chair of the Civic Analytics Network, an association of nearly two-dozen city CDOs, based at Harvard University’s Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation.

D. Darnell Smith

Chief Information Officer, City of Raleigh

 

D. Darnell Smith is the Chief Information Officer for the City of Raleigh, North Carolina. Raleigh is the second largest city in North Carolina and one of the fastest growing cities in the nation. As CIO, he is responsible for technology services and systems that deliver business value to the City and the greater Raleigh community. This includes infrastructure that supports a wide range of technology needs of a vibrant municipality – everything from deploying Office 365 citywide to complex initiatives that include cybersecurity, fiber networks and body-worn cameras for law enforcement. Smith also chairs Raleigh Connected, a public-private initiative that draws on the collective strengths of governments and high-tech businesses in the Triangle. Raleigh Connected combines technology solutions and civic innovation to enable connectivity, encourage economic development, and promote digital inclusion. He also spearheads the City’s involvement in the Smart Cities movement in the Triangle region. Part of this effort involves numerous partnerships with NC State University in building a more connected and sustainable community.

Fireside Chat on Global Innovation (Thursday, December 14th at 8:30AM)

The second day of the MetroLab Annual Summit will kick off with a conversation between Governor Martin O’Malley and Gabe Klein on what smart cities look like around the globe.

Gabe Klein- Moderator

Co-Founder of CityFi

 

Gabe is a co-founder of CityFi, an advisory services firm, as well as is the former Commissioner of the Chicago and Washington D.C Departments of Transportation. In both cities he revamped technology platforms and government processes while focusing on putting people first vs. automobiles on city streets. This included launching two of the first and largest bike share systems in the U.S. and building protected bike lanes and better pedestrian infrastructure for vulnerable citizens citywide, as well as facilitating private services like carshare and rideshare that could help each cities mobility goals. Gabe honed his creativity and leadership skills working in business, including Zipcar, where he served as Vice President, Bikes USA as national Director of Stores and his own electric powered, organic food truck chain, On The Fly. Post-government, and after an enriching fellowship with the Urban Land Institute in 2014, Gabe joined Fontinalis Partners as a Special Venture Partner on their $100 million 2nd fund.

Martin O’Malley

Former Governor of Maryland

 

Martin O’Malley served as the 61st Governor of Maryland from 2007 to 2015 and the 47th Mayor of the City of Baltimore from 1999 until 2007.  His time as governor and mayor was marked by a steadfast commitment to data-driven decision-making.  As mayor, he introduced CitiStat, a performance-based management system that produced dramatic improvements in city services and efficiency and led to Baltimore being awarded the Innovations in Government Award from the Kennedy School at Harvard in 2001.  CitiStat has served as a model for cities across the world.  As governor, he continued to demonstrate results-driven leadership with the introduction of StateStat and BayStat, a system which has since inspired other systems including EPA’s ChesapeakeStat program.  In 2009, Governing Magazine named O’Malley Public Official of the Year for his ability to “improve performance by measuring what [states] do and relentlessly monitoring their progress”.  Governor O’Malley received his bachelor’s degree from Catholic University and his law degree from the University of Maryland.  He and his wife, Katie, a District Court judge, have two daughters, Grace and Tara, and two sons, William and Jack.

Keynote Speaker

Juan Perez

Chief Information and Engineering Officer, UPS

 

Juan Perez is the Chief Information and Engineering Officer for UPS and a member of the UPS Management Committee, responsible for all technology and engineering functions. He was appointed to his current role in April, 2017. Juan was promoted to CIO in 2016, after serving as Vice President of Technology. Through different rotations in that role, he was responsible for technology systems supporting the company’s billing, financial, accounting, human resources, package operations, driver dispatch and operational planning, scanning, logistics, customer service, and sales. Juan’s career has included numerous contributions that have led to greater efficiencies in operations, enhancements to customer service, and reductions in environmental impact. His career has covered assignments in Operations, Industrial Engineering, Process Management, and Technology in corporate, US, and international business units. One of most significant impacts made within the Technology function has been his work with the IT team that developed ORION, the On-road Integrated Optimization and Navigation system that optimizes delivery routes to improve service and efficiencies. The efforts of the IT and business teams in developing this technology will yield, when fully deployed in 2017 to over 55,000 drivers, a reduction of approximately 100 million miles and 100,000 metric tons of carbon emissions while providing significant savings and service improvements to the company.

Video Analytics for Safety and Mobility (Thursday, December 14th at 10:15AM)

 

Every year, 1.25 million lives are lost through road traffic crashes – equivalent of eight Boeing 747 planes crashing every day. Many cities in the world have adopted Vision Zero, which means that we have acknowledged that traffic crashes are not accidents but preventable incidents. With recent advances in technology and video analytics, including developments in computer vision and machine learning, it has become easier to detect and quantify areas of risk before crashes occur. These advances present promising potential for wide-scale implementation and could significantly improve road safety.

Kate Kusiak Galvin

Executive Director, Urban Center for Computation and Data

 

Kate Kusiak Galvin works closely with the Director of UrbanCCD, Charlie Catlett, as well as faculty, scientists, and administrative leaders to strategically develop and coordinate the strategic objectives and programs of the Center.  Prior to joining UrbanCCD in 2013, Kusiak Galvin worked as an Assistant Director for Arete, a research accelerator at the University of Chicago, and was tasked with assisting researchers organizing large-scale interdisciplinary research programs across UChicago. Previously, Kusiak Galvin worked at the American Society for Clinical Pathology. As an Associate Manager in Global Outreach, she was responsible for coordinating training events in Kenya, Rwanda, Swaziland, and Cambodia for laboratory professionals under the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), as well as managing both international and domestic partnerships for the Association.  Kusiak Galvin has an MBA from DePaul University with a concentration in Integrated Marketing Communications and Entrepreneurship. She received her BA in Public Relations with a minor in marketing from Marquette University.

Franz Loewenherz

Principal Transportation Planner, City of Bellevue

 

Franz Loewenherz is a Principal Planner for the City of Bellevue. He received his master’s degree in urban planning from the University of Washington and has more than 20 years of transportation sector experience. Franz has advanced multiple technology development partnerships including overseeing a team from the City of Bellevue, King County, and Federal Highway Administration that leveraged inertial profiling technologies to identify sidewalks with defects that limit access for persons with disabilities. Mr. Loewenherz is project manager of the Video Analytics towards Vision Zero Partnership aimed at developing a predictive crash analysis system for flagging road safety problems.

Tara Pham

CEO, Numina

 

Tara is co-founder and CEO of Numina, a sensor solution that empowers cities with data to become more walkable, bikeable, and responsive. Individually and with Numina, Tara has led city-scale technology projects with the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Code for America, Living Cities, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Clinton Foundation, and others. Prior to civic tech, Tara had previously worked in public health/urban design research, music media, and arts administration. She is also a Next City Vanguard, 500 Startups alumna, 1776NYC Fellow, winner of the $50,000 Globalhack hackathon, Junior Board member of the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, and previous organizer of Sloup, a monthly soup dinner that crowdfunds grassroots creative projects, one bowl of soup at a time.

Privacy and Smart City Technologies (Thursday, December 14th at 11:30 AM)

Jules Polonetsky – Moderator

CEO, Future of Privacy Forum

 

Jules serves as CEO of the Future of Privacy Forum, a Washington, D.C.-based non-profit organization that serves as a catalyst for privacy leadership and scholarship, advancing principled data practices in support of emerging technologies. FPF is supported by the chief privacy officers of more than 130 leading companies, several foundations, as well as by an advisory board comprised of the country’s leading academics and advocates. FPF’s current projects focus on Big Data, Mobile, Location, Apps, the Internet of Things, Wearables, De-Identification, Connected Cars and Student Privacy. Jules previous roles have included serving as Chief Privacy Officer at AOL and before that at DoubleClick, as Consumer Affairs Commissioner for New York City, as an elected New York State Legislator and as a congressional staffer, and as an attorney.

Peter Swire

Professor of Law and Expert on Privacy and Cybersecurity

 

Peter Swire has been a leading privacy and cyberlaw scholar, government leader, and practitioner since the rise of the Internet in the 1990’s. In 2013, he became the Nancy J. and Lawrence P. Huang Professor of Law and Ethics at the Georgia institute of Technology. Swire teaches in the Scheller College of Business, with appointments by courtesy with the College of Computing and School of Public Policy. He is senior counsel with the law firm of Alston & Bird LLP. Swire served as one of five members of President Obama’s Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technology. Prior to that, he was co-chair of the global Do Not Track process for the World Wide Web Consortium. He is a Senior Fellow with the Future of Privacy Forum, and a Member with the National Academy of Sciences & Engineering Forum on Cyber Resilience. Under President Clinton, Swire was the Chief Counselor for Privacy, in the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, the first person to have U.S. government-wide responsibility for privacy policy. Under President Obama, he was Special Assistant to the President for Economic Policy.

Michael Mattmiller

City of Seattle, Chief Technology Officer

 

Michael Mattmiller is responsible for connecting the City to the public, providing the City’s workforce with productivity enhancing technology solutions, and ensuring the public can equitably participate in the City’s high-tech economy. Since joining the City in 2014, Michael has focused on delivering solutions that optimize the City’s use of technology resources, build trust in how the City uses the public’s information, and increased the availability of gigabit broadband service to homes and businesses across Seattle. Prior to his work at the City, Michael was a senior strategist at Microsoft focused on data privacy and protection practices across the company’s enterprise cloud solutions and a consultant with Pricewaterhouse Coopers.

MetroLab Network Governance (Thursday, December 14th at 1:00PM)

 

This session will be an opportunity to update the MetroLab community on  milestones over the past year and plans for the future.

Bill Fulton

Director of the Kinder Institute of Urban Research, Rice University

 

Bill Fulton is a former Mayor of Ventura, California, and Director of Planning & Economic Development for the City of San Diego. In his career, Mr. Fulton has also served as Vice President for Policy at Smart Growth America, Principal in the California-based urban planning firm now known as PlaceWorks, and Senior Fellow at the Sol Price School of Public Policy at the University of Southern California. He is the founding editor and publisher of California Planning & Development Report  and author of five books, including Guide to California Planning, the standard urban planning textbook in California, and The Reluctant Metropolis: The Politics of Urban Growth in Los Angeles, which was an L.A. Times best-seller. He holds master’s degrees in mass communication from The American University and urban planning from UCLA.

Ben Levine

Executive Director, MetroLab Network

 

Ben serves as Executive Director of MetroLab Network, having initially served as Interim Director of the organization following its launch. Prior to that role, Ben served as a Policy Advisor at the U.S. Department of the Treasury, where he was responsible for policy development pertaining to state and local government finance, with a particular focus on infrastructure policy. He worked closely with the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy on the organization and launch of MetroLab Network. Prior to his role at Treasury, Ben worked at Morgan Stanley, where he provided investment banking services to state and local government clients. He is a graduate of the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.

Rick Stafford

Distinguished Service Professor of Public Policy in the H. John Heinz III College of Public Policy and Management, Carnegie Mellon University

 

Rick Stafford is the Executive Director of the University’s Metro21 Initiative and previously helped launch and direct the University’s Traffic21 Initiative. Traffic21 is now a CMU Institute. He earned bachelor and masters degrees from Carnegie Mellon University. He served as Chief Executive Officer for the Allegheny Conference on Community Development for thirteen years. Prior to the Conference, he served as Secretary of Legislative Affairs in the cabinet of Pennsylvania Governor Dick Thornburgh during the governor’s first term and as chief of staff for the last year and a half of his second term. He was born in Greene County Pennsylvania and his family owns Laurel Vista Farm in Somerset County Pennsylvania.

“First, Do No Harm” – Applying Predictive Analytics to Human Services (Thursday, December 14th at 1:30PM)

 

Predictive Risk Modeling tools are moving rapidly into the public sector, raising both hopes and fears about how this will affect some of the most crucial decisions governments make to intervene with families and communities. What practical steps can data scientists and local leaders to ensure these machine-augmented decisions are transparent, fair and effective? During this session, MetroLab will explore it’s latest report: First, Do No Harm: Ethical Guidelines for Applying Predictive Tools Within Human Services.

Chris Kingsley – Moderator

Senior Consultant, MetroLab Network

 

Chris Kingsley is overseeing the development of the MetroLab Network’s human services initiatives and consults nationally on projects directed at improving the public sector’s ability to use data to achieve better results. He has written, advocated for, and provided training on issues related to administrative data systems, information sharing and privacy policy as part of the teams at Data Quality Campaign and National League of Cities. Chris is a graduate of Haverford College and the University of Pennsylvania. Chris is working with MetroLab through the consulting firm Better Measured.

Alexandra Chouldechova

Assistant Professor of Statistics and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University

 

Alexandra Chouldechova is an Assistant Professor of Statistics and Public Policy at the Carnegie Mellon University H. John Heinz III College.  Her current research focuses on problems related to algorithmic fairness, discrimination and transparency in criminal justice and human services applications of risk assessment instruments.  In recent work, she has explored the implications of different notions of algorithmic fairness, and has developed statistical methods for conducting model comparisons across various types of task-relevant accuracy and fairness metrics.  Dr. Chouldechova received her Ph.D. in Statistics from Stanford University in 2014.

Erin Dalton

Deputy Director, Office of Data Analysis, Research and Evaluation, Allegheny County Department of Human Services

 

As Deputy Director for the Office of Data Analysis, Research and Evaluation, Erin Dalton is responsible for directing the research and evaluation activities of the Department of Human Services. Ms. Dalton has held policy positions with the Allegheny County Executive’s Office and the United States Department of Justice and was an adjunct staff member at the RAND Corporation. Ms. Dalton is a board member of Neighborhood Allies and was a mayoral appointee to the Pittsburgh Civilian Police Review Board and a county executive appointee to the Allegheny County Juvenile Detention Board of Advisers. Ms. Dalton received a Master’s of Science from Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz School of Public Policy.

Bill Howe

Associate Director and Senior Data Science Fellow, UW eScience Institute 

 

Bill Howe is an Associate Professor in the Information School, Adjunct Associate Professor in Computer Science & Engineering, and Associate Director and Senior Data Science Fellow at the UW eScience Institute. He co-founded of Urban@UW, and with support from the MacArthur Foundation and Microsoft, lead UW’s participation in the MetroLab Network. He created a first MOOC on Data Science through Coursera, and he led the creation of the UW Data Science Masters Degree, where he serves as its first Program Director and Faculty Chair. He serves on the Steering Committee of the Center for Statistics in the School of Social Sciences.

Kathy Park

CEO, National Council on Crime and Delinquency

 

Kathy Park is CEO of the National Council on Crime and Delinquency (NCCD). She provides strategic vision and oversight to the organization’s portfolio of government- and foundation- funded research and data analysis projects in child welfare, juvenile and criminal justice, and adult protective services. She is currently focused on building NCCD’s efforts toward lessening racial disparities in these social systems and creating community-based solutions to persistent problems. Ms. Park has 17 years’ experience at NCCD, a 110-year- old organization that partners with agencies and jurisdictions across the United States and in Canada, Bermuda, Australia, Singapore, and Taiwan. Ms. Park began her career as child welfare investigator in Georgia.

Future of Privacy Forum Discussion: Smart Cities and Open Data (Thursday, December 14th at 2:30PM & 4:00PM)

The Smart Cities and Open Data movements promise to use data to spark civic innovation and engagement, promote inclusivity, and transform modern communities. At the same time, advances in sensor technology, re-identification science, and Big Data analytics have challenged cities and their partners to construct effective safeguards for the collection, use, sharing, and disposal of personal information. As cities harness more data than ever, how can we assess the risks and opportunities of new technologies and data flows while preserving public trust and individual privacy? In this roundtable style discussion, come hear from City CIOs, academic leaders, and industry experts developing emerging frameworks for addressing privacy challenges in open data and examine the opportunities and challenges of new urban instrumentation.

Privacy and Open Data

 

The Smart Cities and Open Data movements promise to use data to spark civic innovation and engagement, promote inclusivity, and transform modern communities. At the same time, advances in sensor technology, re-identification science, and Big Data analytics have challenged cities and their partners to construct effective safeguards for the collection, use, sharing, and disposal of personal information. In this breakout session, we will discuss privacy risks in open data programs and how cities like Seattle are promoting transparency while protecting individual rights.

Kelsey Finch – Moderator

Policy Counsel, Future of Privacy Forum

 

Kelsey Finch is Policy Counsel at the Future of Privacy Forum. Her projects at FPF include consumer wellness and wearables, big data, de-identification standards and privacy by design. Before coming to FPF, Kelsey was an inaugural Westin Fellow at the IAPP, where she produced practical research on a range of privacy topics and edited the FTC Privacy Casebook. She is a graduate of Smith College and the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, with a concentration in Intellectual Property & Information Law.

Michael Mattmiller

City of Seattle, Chief Technology Officer

 

Michael Mattmiller is responsible for connecting the City to the public, providing the City’s workforce with productivity enhancing technology solutions, and ensuring the public can equitably participate in the City’s high-tech economy. Since joining the City in 2014, Michael has focused on delivering solutions that optimize the City’s use of technology resources, build trust in how the City uses the public’s information, and increased the availability of gigabit broadband service to homes and businesses across Seattle. Prior to his work at the City, Michael was a senior strategist at Microsoft focused on data privacy and protection practices across the company’s enterprise cloud solutions and a consultant with Pricewaterhouse Coopers.

Jesse Woo

Lawyer and Research Faculty, Georgia Tech

 

Jesse Woo is a lawyer and research faculty member at Georgia Tech studying privacy and cybersecurity. He has written about privacy issues in open data and smart city development and participated in a study of Seattle’s open data policy through the University of Washington. He was also part of an interdisciplinary team of Smart Cities Fellow at Georgia Tech, where he examined critical perspectives on smart cities. He is a graduate of the University of Washington.

Privacy and Urban Instrumentation

 

Description: As cities harness more data than ever, how can we assess the risks and opportunities of new technologies and data flows while preserving public trust and individual privacy? In this breakout session, come hear from Cities, CIOs, academic leaders, and industry experts as we examine the opportunities and challenges of new urban instrumentation and how we can come together to address privacy challenges in smart cities.

Annie Antón – Moderator

Professor, College of Computing, Georgia Tech

 

Annie Antón is Professor and Chair of the School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Tech. Previously she served as a Professor in the Computer Science Department of the College of Engineering at North Carolina State University, where she was Director of the CSC Policy and Compliance Initiative and a member of the NCSU Cyber Defense Lab. In 2010 she chaired the NC State University Reappointment, Promotion and Tenure Committee. In 2008, she chaired the NC State Public Policy Task Force.

Antón’s research focuses on methods and tools to support the specification of complete, correct behavior of software systems used in environments that pose risks of loss as a consequence of failures and misuse. This includes Web-based and healthcare systems in which the security of personal and private information is particularly vulnerable. Current extensions to this work, include the analysis of security and privacy policies, regulations and compliance practices.

Jonathan Fox

Director, Privacy Engineering and Strategy and Planning, Cisco

 

Jonathan Fox, Director of Privacy Engineering and Strategy and Planning, is a member of Cisco’s Chief Privacy Office and co-author of THE PRIVACY ENGINEER’S MANIFESTO, Getting from Policy to Code to QA to Value (ApressOpen 2014). With over 17 years of privacy experience, Jonathan’s principal areas of focus have been product development, government relations, mergers and acquisitions, and training. He is a Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US), a Certified Information Privacy Manager (CIPM), and was a Certified Information Security Manager (CISM). Prior to Cisco, Jonathan was a Senior Privacy Engineer at Intel.  His previous roles have included Director of Data Privacy, McAfee; Director of Privacy, eBay; Deputy Chief Privacy Officer for Sun Microsystems, and Editor-in-Chief of sun.com. Jonathan frequently speaks at industry events and is a member of the IEEE P7002 Personal Data Privacy Working Group and the OASIS Privacy by Design Documentation for Software Engineers Technical Committee.

Nigel Jacob

City of Boston, Co-Founder, Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics

 

Nigel Jacob is the Co-founder of the Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics, a civic innovation incubator and R&D Lab within Boston’s City Hall.  Nigel’s work is about making urban life better via innovative, people-oriented applications of technology and design. Prior to joining the City of Boston in 2006, Nigel worked in a series of technology start-ups in the Boston area. He was also previously the Urban Technologist in Residence at Living Cities, a philanthropic collaboration of 22 of the world’s largest foundations and financial institutions, is currently a board member at organizations such as Code For America and coUrbanize, and is an Executive-in-Residence at Boston University. Nigel’s work has been written about extensively in magazines such as Wired, MIT Technology Review, Fast Company and books including The Responsive City, by Stephen Goldsmith and Susan Crawford and Smart Cities by Anthony Townsend. This ground breaking work has earned Nigel a number of awards including being named a Public Official of the year in 2011 by Governing Magazine, a Whitehouse Champion of Change and the Tribeca Disruptive Innovation award for 2012.

Scott Shipman

General Counsel & Chief Privacy Officer, Verizon

 

Scott R. Shipman is the General Counsel and Chief Privacy Officer (CPO) for Sensity Systems Inc. He is responsible for the legal function, privacy and data protection, information security and physical security aspects of the company. He brings more than 16 years of legal expertise to the company.

Before Sensity, Scott spent his entire legal career at eBay Inc. as an in-house attorney. After taking eBay public in 1998, Scott helped build many of eBay’s legal functions. Most recently, he built and led the privacy practice, serving as eBay’s CPO. He managed and oversaw the privacy practices for all eBay including eBay Marketplaces, PayPal, and Skype during which time eBay received the “Most Trusted Brand For Privacy” designation from the Ponemon Institute.

Scott earned his JD with an emphasis in High Tech Law from Santa Clara University School of Law and a BA in Environmental Conservation from University of Colorado at Boulder. Bringing his expertise and career experience to teaching, Scott is a professor at Santa Clara University School of Law, teaching Comparative Privacy Law.

Environmental Sensing (Thursday, September 14th at 2:30 PM & 4:00 PM)

Air Quality Sensing

This breakout session will provide an opportunity to discuss the ways that cities are using new networking and sensing capabilities to monitor, evaluate, and act on localized air quality data. Participants will discuss the socio-technical issues associated with air quality sensing: placement and networking of sensors; citizen engagement with data; and intersections with urban planning and public health. The session will also explore the ways that cities and universities can work together on sensing projects and collaborate on technology development and data analytics.

Christine Kendrink- Moderator

Air Quality Lead & a Smart Cities Project Manager – City of Portland

 

Christine Kendrick is the Air Quality Lead and a Smart Cities Project Manager for the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. She also works closely with a multi-disciplinary team across City agencies developing use cases, research objectives and guidelines related to the deployment of sensors in the public right of way. As part of the BPS team, she supports Smart Cities coordination and strategy for the City of Portland. Christine has a PhD in Environmental Science and Resources with a focus on urban air quality from Portland State University. Her work investigated how the roadside environment can be improved through the use of air quality and traffic-related data. Christine also has a background in toxicology research characterizing inhalation exposures to jet propulsion fuel and trichloroethylene air sampling in industrial and residential areas. She completed her BS in Environmental Health Science from the College of Public Health at the University of Georgia.

Don DuRousseau

Director of Research Technology Services – The George Washington University

 

Don DuRousseau is the Director of Research Technology Services at The George Washington University. He has more than 25 years of research and development experience in real-time systems, cybersecurity, and big data informatics. He is an active contributor to the fields of Smart Cities, IoT, Systems Engineering and Adaptive Networking technologies. He is the Director of the Capital Area Advanced Research and Education Network (CAAREN); a high performance networking collaboration located at GW’s Ashburn campus. Don also operates the Colonial One High Performance Computing Cluster at GW, providing advanced computational systems to support over 200 research groups across the University. Don has more than 40 publications on topics including real time signal processing, adaptive systems, and performance engineering. His recent work involves the broad dissemination of cybersecurity and smart communities technologies working with the District of Columbia, National Capital Planning Commission, and Internet2 to deliver high speed connectivity and computational resources to the Research and Education communities across the region, including MetroLab Network partners at Howard, Georgetown, and American Universities.

James Matthews

Senior Research Associate – University of Bristol

 

Dr James Matthews has worked since his PhD at the University of Bristol and has worked on measurements of the dispersion of gases and particles, and how these may have an effect on human health. His PhD and subsequent work in the School of Physics measured charged particle release from HV overhead power lines, and current work in the School of Chemistry, Atmospheric Chemistry Research Group, concerns the dispersion of pollutant gases and aerosols in urban environments using inert tracers and aerosol measurements.  Recently he has started working with project partners within the school of Engineering to investigate whether smart city technologies and low cost sensors can be used as an aid to research campaigns.

Noel Nelson

Scientist, Epidemiology, The Pirbright Institute 

 

Noel Nelson is an atmospheric dispersion modeller who works in the Transmission Biology Group and is seconded to The Pirbright Institute from the Met Office. His main research area involves the investigation of meteorological influences in the transmission of animal diseases. More specifically his work has focussed on those diseases for which the weather can be considered as an influencing factor. Collectively the collaboration between the Met Office and the Institute has led to a unique partnership which has allowed both organisations to develop new insights into the transmission of certain animal related diseases.

Andrew James Williams

Lecturer, University of Exeter

 

Dr. Williams’ research interests lie in the social and environmental determinants of health and the use of routinely collected data. In particular he is interested in the public health applications of theories such as complexity theory and salutogenesis and examining the extent to which combining routinely collected data, appropriate statistical methods and theory can aid our understanding of social change and causality. Formerly the Research Fellow in Natural Experimental Approaches for the Farr Institute in Scotland (www.farrinstitute.org) at the University of Edinburgh, Dr Williams is now a Lecturer in Public Health at the European Centre for Environment and Human Health, University of Exeter (http://www.ecehh.org/).

Urban Water Sensing

Across the US, governments are beginning to use a variety of networked sensor technologies to monitor and control urban water events. This breakout session will be an opportunity to discuss methods of monitoring urban water, including stormwater management and coastal flooding. Participants will discuss the successes and challenges of current projects as well as the roles cities, citizens, and universities play in implementing these systems. It will also be an opportunity to discuss potential future collaborations on development of research and deployment projects.  

Santiago Garces- Moderator

City of South Bend, Chief Innovation Officer 

 

Santiago Garces started the Office of Innovation in January of 2015. The Office of Innovation improves the efficiency and effectiveness of municipal services by developing talent, optimizing processes, and designing technology solutions.  Some of the projects that the Office has implemented include a data framework to evaluate policies like the city’s Vacant and Abandoned Properties initiative; an actionable report that engages residents using municipal route, fleet, and dispatch optimization for public safety and municipal services. Overall the Office has identified and commenced implementations of projects that should save taxpayers over $11 million dollars. South Bend and the University of Notre Dame entered an agreement that identifies Mr. Garces as the point of contact for the city in its collaborations for smart city research. In September of 2015 South Bend and Notre Dame became founding members of the Metro Lab Network. Originally from Bogotá, Colombia, Mr. Garces holds degrees in Electrical Engineering, Political Science, and Technology Entrepreneurship from the University of Notre Dame.

Alex Bedig

VP of Information and Technology, Co-Founder, Opti Platform

 

Mr. Bedig is driven to deploy market-valued, observation-based environmental information services because he believes developing new valuations of verifiable environmental behaviors can improve environmental justice outcomes. He joined Geosyntec Consultants in 2009 to lead research and software development on the project that would become the Opti Platform. Since 2010, he has been simultaneously working on Opti and pursuing a doctorate in Hydro Informatics at Tufts University. His doctoral research focuses on discovery of publicly available hydrologic data sets. Mr. Bedig holds an MS in Water Resources Engineering and a BS in Engineering Science from Tufts University.

Alistair McLean

Senior Solutions Architect, Amazon Web Services

 

Originally from the west coast of Scotland, Alistair is a Senior Solutions Architect at Amazon Web Services covering State and Local Government customers in the Tristate area based in NY.  Prior to this, Alistair spent 10 years in the finance industry working in the UK and Europe at various institutions in a number of front office development and management roles.  In his spare time, he enjoys Golf, Skiing, travel and his brand-new family.

Tiffany Troxler

Director, Sea Level Solutions Center, Florida International University

 

Tiffany Troxler is a research scientist with appointments in the Southeast Environmental Research Center and Department of Biological Sciences at Florida International University. Her research focus is wetland ecosystems ecology. Her research employs approaches that include landscape- to local-scale hydrological monitoring of surface and groundwater water quality and ecosystem responses to environmental change. Her research informs management and restoration of coastal and freshwater wetland ecosystems. She currently leads a collaborative effort that will examine the effects of salinity inundation associated with sea-level rise on soil carbon balance in Everglades coastal wetlands. She is also contributing to a collaborative project led by the USGS to scale coastal carbon stocks and fluxes using remote sensing products.

Brandon Wong

Ph.D. Candidate, University of Michigan

 

Brandon P. Wong is a Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Michigan in Civil and Environmental Engineering working with Professor Branko Kerkez, degree expected December 2017. He obtained a B.S. and M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from UC Berkeley and an M.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Michigan. His main research focus is on the development and validation of active, resilient urban water systems for managing stormwater using wireless sensing and control.

Predictive Analytics for Child Welfare: Fundamental Principles (Thursday, December 14th at 2:30PM & 4:00PM)

Predictive Analytics for Child Welfare

 

Rhema and Tim will describe the current predictive analytics landscape and explain what is involved in taking a predictive analytics project to implementation. In particular, they will talk about ‘defining the problem’ and the significance of fairness, transparency, ethics and community engagement.

Rhema Vaithianathan

Co-Director, Centre for Social and Data Analytics, Auckland University of Technology
Professor, School of Economics, Auckland University of Technology

 

Rhema is co-director of the Centre for Social Data Analytics at Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand, where she is also a Professor of Economics.  Rhema is internationally recognised for her ambitious research using linked administrative data.  She led the international research team that developed the Allegheny Family Screening Tool (AFST), a child welfare predictive risk modelling tool for Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.  Allegheny County implemented the AFST, which aims to support call screeners to make better decisions, in August 2016.  Rhema is leading and collaborating on the development of a number of other US predictive risk modelling tools, including leading the team building a prototype child welfare predictive risk model for Colorado State with a focus on implementing it in Douglas County. She has held numerous research positions in Australia, Singapore and US including a Harkness Fellowship at Harvard University.

Tim Maloney

Co-Director, Centre for Social Data Analytics, Auckland University of Technology,
Professor and Head, School of Economics, Auckland University of Technology

 

Tim is co-director of the Centre for Social Data Analytics at Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand, where he is also a Professor and Head of the School of Economics at AUT.  Tim is part of the research team that developed the Allegheny Family Screening Tool (AFST), a child welfare predictive risk model for Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.  Allegheny County implemented the AFST in August 2016.  Tim regularly collaborates with his co-director Rhema Vaithianathan on a range of predictive risk modelling projects in the United States.  His research areas include Labour Economics, Econometrics and Public Policy. Tim’s previous appointments include positions in the Economics Departments of the University of Missouri, Bowdoin College and the University of Auckland. He gained his PhD in Economics from the University of Wisconsin – Madison.

Approaches to assessing fairness in Child Welfare Predictive Risk Models

 

Alexandra will discuss her work-to-date and upcoming strategies to assess fairness of Child Welfare predictive risk models with the goal of ensuring that not only are the models more accurate than existing approaches, but are also demonstrably free from discriminatory biases.

Alexandra Chouldechova

Assistant Professor of Statistics and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University

 

Alexandra Chouldechova is an Assistant Professor of Statistics and Public Policy at the Carnegie Mellon University H. John Heinz III College.  Her current research focuses on problems related to algorithmic fairness, discrimination and transparency in criminal justice and human services applications of risk assessment instruments.  In recent work, she has explored the implications of different notions of algorithmic fairness, and has developed statistical methods for conducting model comparisons across various types of task-relevant accuracy and fairness metrics.  Dr. Chouldechova received her Ph.D. in Statistics from Stanford University in 2014.

Implementation – Lessons from Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

 

Erin will talk through the process of getting the Allegheny Family Screening Tool to implementation; starting from putting out an RFP and selecting a provider through to details like policy decisions, staff training and communicating with the local community and media.

Erin Dalton

Deputy Director, Office of Data Analysis, Research and Evaluation, Allegheny County Department of Human Services

 

As Deputy Director for the Office of Data Analysis, Research and Evaluation, Erin Dalton is responsible for directing the research and evaluation activities of the Department of Human Services. Ms. Dalton has held policy positions with the Allegheny County Executive’s Office and the United States Department of Justice and was an adjunct staff member at the RAND Corporation. Ms. Dalton is a board member of Neighborhood Allies and was a mayoral appointee to the Pittsburgh Civilian Police Review Board and a county executive appointee to the Allegheny County Juvenile Detention Board of Advisers. Ms. Dalton received a Master’s of Science from Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz School of Public Policy.

Getting to the start line – Lessons from Douglas County, Colorado

 

Douglas County has recently collaborated with the State of Colorado to embark on a development of a predictive analytics prototype for Child Welfare. Ruby will explain the process of securing support and funding from a range of sources in order to get a predictive risk model project off the ground.

Ruby Richards

Child Welfare Administrator, Douglas County Department of Human Services

 

As the Child Welfare Administrator for Douglas County Department of Human Services, Ruby Richards is responsible for the daily operations for child protection assessments, ongoing family service planning, coordinating with external service providers, and directing quality assurance and evaluation activities for the department. Ms. Richards has over 20 years state and county child welfare experience in Texas and Colorado.

Optional SmartATL Week Event (Friday, September 15th, 10:00 AM)

 

The City of Atlanta is gearing up for an event at Ponce City Market to showcase Smart City technology that improves quality of life in cities.  The focus will be on Atlanta, with exhibits from various City of Atlanta departments, academic partners, public sector partners, and companies the City has worked with to realize its vision.

There will be two sessions showcasing smart city technology, one in the morning at 10 AM to 12 PM and another in the afternoon at 1 PM to 3 PM. Both sessions will have the same content, and registering with Eventbrite for only one of the two sessions is required for entry on the day of the event. Space is limited so be sure to register.